Archive for May, 2012

Robert is writing faster than I can draw. I’ve got to try to catch up with him. It’s embarrassing. He’s twenty years older than I. This is my latest attempt. Marco the Magnificent (or Marco the Mediocre, as he is known to his peers) and Bernie the wolf in rabbit clothing.

Who would blink first in a staring contest? My money’s on Bernie.

Canine Bi-Polarism?

 

“That’s All Folks”

This is a link to a great appearance Mel made on David Letterman many years ago. He was still in top form, demonstrating many of his voices for Dave and the audience. There is also a nice video montage of his characters. He talks about the fine points of making cartoons, his relationship with Jack Benny and more.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iHYEt4zptRg

Cremate this, mofo Bohos!

Grove of the Damned, https://mongrel4u.wordpress.com/2010/02/12/grove-of-the-damned/

“Burning of Care”, https://mongrel4u.wordpress.com/2010/05/11/ritualized-burning-of-care-and-other-bohemian-amusements/

https://mongrel4u.wordpress.com/2010/07/16/making-a-moloch-out-of-a-mole-hill/

What is it good for, hunh? Good God.

Wikipedia:

Edwin Starr (January 21, 1942 – April 2, 2003) was an American soul music singer. Starr is most famous for his Norman Whitfield produced singles of the 1970s, most notably the number one hit “War“.

Starr was born Charles Edwin Hatcher in Nashville, Tennessee, in 1942. He and his cousins, soul singers Roger and Willie Hatcher, moved to Cleveland, Ohio, where they were raised.

In 1957, Starr formed a doo-wop group, The Future Tones, and began his singing career. Starr lived in Detroit, Michigan, in the 1960s and recorded at first for the small record label Ric-Tic, and later for Motown Records after the latter absorbed Ric-Tic in 1968.

The song which began his career was “Agent Double’O’Soul” (1965), a reference to the James Bond films popular at the time. Other early hits included “Headline News”, “Back Street”, a cover of The Miracles “Way Over There”, and “S.O.S. (Stop Her On Sight)”. He recorded more soul music for the next three years before having an international hit in “25 Miles” (1968), which peaked at #6 in the United States the following year.

The biggest hit of his career, which cemented his reputation, was the Vietnam War protest songWar” (1970). Starr’s intense vocals transformed a Temptations album track into a #1 chart success, which spent three weeks in the top position on the US Billboard charts, an anthem for the antiwar movement and a cultural milestone that continues to resound in movie soundtracks and hip hop music samples. It sold over three million copies, and was awarded a gold disc. “War” appeared on both Starr’s War and Peace album and its follow-up, Involved. Involved also featured another song of similar construction titled “Stop the War Now”, which was a minor hit in its own right.

WAR

War, huh, yeah What is it good for Absolutely nothing Uh-huh War, huh, yeah What is it good for Absolutely nothing Say it again, y’all

War, huh, good God What is it good for Absolutely nothing Listen to me

Ohhh, war, I despise Because it means destruction Of innocent lives

War means tears To thousands of mothers eyes When their sons go to fight And lose their lives

I said, war, huh Good God, y’all What is it good for Absolutely nothing Say it again

War, whoa, Lord What is it good for Absolutely nothing Listen to me

War, it ain’t nothing But a heartbreaker War, friend only to the undertaker Ooooh, war It’s an enemy to all mankind The point of war blows my mind War has caused unrest Within the younger generation Induction then destruction Who wants to die Aaaaah, war-huh Good God y’all What is it good for Absolutely nothing Say it, say it, say it War, huh What is it good for Absolutely nothing Listen to me

War, huh, yeah What is it good for Absolutely nothing Uh-huh War, huh, yeah What is it good for Absolutely nothing Say it again y’all War, huh, good God What is it good for Absolutely nothing Listen to me

War, it ain’t nothing but a heartbreaker War, it’s got one friend That’s the undertaker Ooooh, war, has shattered Many a young mans dreams Made him disabled, bitter and mean Life is much to short and precious To spend fighting wars these days War can’t give life It can only take it away

Ooooh, war, huh Good God y’all What is it good for Absolutely nothing Say it again

War, whoa, Lord What is it good for Absolutely nothing Listen to me

War, it ain’t nothing but a heartbreaker War, friend only to the undertaker Peace, love and understanding Tell me, is there no place for them today They say we must fight to keep our freedom But Lord knows there’s got to be a better way

Ooooooh, war, huh Good God y’all What is it good for You tell me Say it, say it, say it, say it

War, huh Good God y’all What is it good for Stand up and shout it NOTHING!

Here’s a link to a good Bruce Springsteen version from the Eighties:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mn91L9goKfQ&feature=related

https://mongrel4u.wordpress.com/2010/09/18/those-amazing-humans-76-christopher-lee/

Christopher Lee

https://mongrel4u.wordpress.com/2011/03/15/those-amazing-humans-260-harlan-ellison/

Harlan Ellison